Stitch by Stitch - Contemporary handmade textiles from India & Nepal

Contemporary handmade soft furnishings from India & Nepal

What caught our eye at Clerkenwell Design Week

Karen Sear ShimaliComment
Slovakian ceramicist Silvia K's tin-glazed earthenware platters with leather detailing.

Slovakian ceramicist Silvia K's tin-glazed earthenware platters with leather detailing.

What I love most about London's Clerkenwell Design Week is the sheer diversity of open showrooms and exhibitors, scattered throughout the historic streets and buildings in one of London's most interesting enclaves.  This, and the lack of any tight format to which exhibitors must conform.

Now in its 7th year, the festival brings together furniture makers, manufacturers, textile designers, lighting companies, architects and artists - big and small, well-known and undiscovered.  The only selection criteria appears to be high quality, imagination and innovation manifested in interesting products for the interiors sector.  

It can be a bit confusing navigating your way around the myriad of exhibits dotted throughout the medieval streets of EC1.  I always miss something, and inevitably get happily lost, even though I used to live and work nearby!

Here are a few snippets of inspiration we wanted to share:

Designer-maker Varni Southern Wickery from Thailand, supported by The British Council. 

Designer-maker Varni Southern Wickery from Thailand, supported by The British Council. 

Pillar Candlesticks, rings and vessels from Thai designer-makers Patapian.  Combining Thai wicker weaving techniques with other local craft skills.

Pillar Candlesticks, rings and vessels from Thai designer-makers Patapian.  Combining Thai wicker weaving techniques with other local craft skills.

Tania Johnson Design exhibited pieces from her beautiful Journeys in Colour collection of hand knotted rugs, inspired by her photographs of light, shadows and reflections.  She works with makers in Nepal, supported by humanitarian organisation Good Weave.

Tania Johnson Design exhibited pieces from her beautiful Journeys in Colour collection of hand knotted rugs, inspired by her photographs of light, shadows and reflections.  She works with makers in Nepal, supported by humanitarian organisation Good Weave.

Billboards by Giles Miller Studio for British Ceramic Tile.  Large-scale, abstract signage sculptures in glass tiles that aimed to help visitors navigate their way around the festival.

Billboards by Giles Miller Studio for British Ceramic Tile.  Large-scale, abstract signage sculptures in glass tiles that aimed to help visitors navigate their way around the festival.